Closing the Gap Between Strategy and Results

RPM Systems Corporation

Copyright © 2011 RPM Systems Corporation

With PMforCTE students demonstrating their PM skills in project-based learning at school and even more visibly in community-based projects, the question will be asked, “What training in project management does our superintendent or other district administrators have?”  Just as education is not deliberate about teaching project management to students, education administrator programs do little to intentionally prepare education leaders to be project, program or portfolio managers.

In the industry standard PM lexicon, project managers are focused on clearly identifiable projects, program managers administrate groups of projects, and portfolio managers administrate groups of programs.  

In education, school district superintendents are primarily portfolio managers, as the leading administrator of district program managers.  Central district administrators are primarily program managers, overseeing a variety of projects in their area of expertise.  Project management is typically accomplished by the person assigned to or initiating the project, and that can end up at any level, student, teacher, principal, central admin or superintendent.


Different levels of skills in project, program and portfolio management are key for Superintendents, Principals and other education leaders


PM for EDU

Strategic ThroughputGutenberg II

The coming revolution in Education



D

PMforCTE

Project Management for
Career and Technical Education

A


Portfolio

Project, Program, and
Portfolio

 Management



B

Expanding Strategic Throughput to Close the Gap between Strategy and Results

C

Portfolio

Throughput

Gutenberg II



PM for

Secondary School Students (Exploratory First Semester)

PM for

Secondary School Students

(Second Year)

PM for

CTE Teachers

PM for

Principals

PM for

Superintendents

Project Management







The Project Life Cycle and Organization

2

4

2 to 4

2

1


Project Management Processes

2

4

2 to 4

2

1

Knowledge Area







Project Integration and Scope

2

4

2 to 4

3

1


Project Stakeholder Management

2

4

2 to 4




Project Time and Cost

2

4

2 to 4

3

1


Project Quality

2

4

2 to 4

2

1


Project Human Resources

2

4

2 to 4

2

1


Project Communications

2

4

2 to 4

2

1


Project Risk

2

4

2 to 4

2

1


Project Procurement

2

4

2 to 4

2

1

Program Management




4

3

Portfolio Management





4

Strategic Portfolio Management





4

Portfolio

PMforCTE

Expert

5

Detailed

4

Conversant

3

Overview

2

Exposure

1

A – Through staff development, CTE teachers are learning how to teach PM within their classes or as a stand-alone PM class.  Students are applying PM skills to their class projects and with community-based projects.  This part of the educational community will increasingly demonstrate these skills, and cause the community to ask, “What training in project management does our superintendent and other administrators have?”


B – Using the standard vocabulary and process skills of the project, program and portfolio management hierarchy, the education community can become more organized and deliberate in the continuous improvement of their learning mission.  


C Too often, a school district strategic plan or plan for improvement founders due to lack of project, program or portfolio management skills.  Implementation and continuous improvement miss the mark.  In order to expand strategic throughput and increase measurable results, superintendents and other c-level education administrators (CEO, CFO, Chief Academic Officer and others) must have gap analysis and remediation skills, or know where to get them.

D – With a general lack of project, program and portfolio skills, education leaders and practitioners are ill-prepared to be proactive or even responsive to the transformational impact of digital texts, cloud computing and new ways/options of learning as a result of “Gutenberg II”.


Superintendents don’t generally need to be great project managers, but they need to know the right questions to ask of program and project managers.  Principals need a variety of skills in program and project management, but not so much portfolio management skills.  This matrix (below) illustrates an example of the different levels of skills that are needed throughout a school district:

Overview of PM for EDU

MindView

Build 7-12 Secondary School Instruction

MindView

Open New 7-12 High School

Close 5-8

Middle School

The three diagrams shown above were produced using MindView, a product of MatchWare Corporation.  MindView is extremely easy-to-use.  You do not have to be a project management expert to be a power user.  The software allows you to create mind maps which, at the click of a button can be turned into work breakdown structure diagrams, and then task lists and schedules.  MindView also facilitates planning time phased resources.

The diagram to the right is a Microsoft Project schedule that automatically imported all 3 MindView projects (above).  This provides a school district superintendent and other senior management leaders with an aggregate view of the total portfolio of programs and projects.


This is another view from Microsoft Project.  It shows who is assigned to which tasks and when.

Portfolio